Pumpkin Seed Pesto Recipe

January 31, 2012



Pesto is one of the easiest, most gourmet-tasting recipes to play with—and it's raw food! Using pumpkin seeds makes this version not only tasty, but high in essential fatty acids and protein (pumpkin seeds have about 29% more protein than most other seeds). Plus, pumpkin seeds contains most of the B vitamins, C, D, E and K, as well as calcium, potassium, and phosphorus. Use this pesto as a veggie dip, mix it onto pasta, spread it on crackers, in tortilla wraps, or keep it raw on salads, or in lettuce rolls.

Here I blended the following:
•1 bunch of basil leaves.
•About 2/3 c. of raw pumpkin seeds.
•Olive oil (just enough to blend ingredients smoothly—add a little at a time if you're unsure).
•1 clove of garlic.
•Salt to taste.
Optional additions: a spoonful of nutritional yeast, parsley, sun-dried tomatoes (on top or blended in). You can also use pine nuts, cashews, or macadamia nuts in place of pumpkin seeds.

Sweet and Savory Spiced Kale

January 16, 2012

Before we were vegan, neither Bua nor I had ever had kale. Now, 16 and 9 years later, respectively, our weekly farmers market purchase usually includes 4-10 bunches. And it's not just us vegans (though I do believe we are responsible for the trend). This deep, hearty green has become the new romaine apparently. Our basic raw kale salad recipe is still great, but if you're looking for a new variation, try this Indian-spiced dressing:

Coat chopped, raw kale with olive oil.
Add sea salt and Braggs to taste (or shoyu), and a good dose to taste of both turmeric and cinammon.
Mix and bruise until kale is soft, or mix and let sit to soften.

Turmeric is known in Ayurvedic and other natural medicine traditions for it's anti-cancer, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties (which applies to pretty much every disease or malady one might have)—all in all, a great thing to have in your spice pantry and weekly repertoire. Read a great description of the benefits here. Cinnamon as well is considered to have beneficial properties for the digestive, circulatory, and respiratory systems.

Kale Salad: The Crowd Pleaser

July 5, 2011



No one doesn't like this savory salad. It's the one recipe we've spread around the most...and it's a life changer.

1. Wash the kale (any kind will do).
2. Debone (or not) and chop/rip up.
3. Add Braggs Aminos to taste and coat with olive oil. The more you stir and massage, the softer the kale.
4. Top with nutritional yeast.

Keep a head or two of washed kale in your fridge in a salad spinner and you'll be set for days. Or make a huge batch and marinate overnight.

Other great toppings: red onion or garlic, a dollop of hummus, lemon juice, sea salt, avocado, dried cranberries and sliced almonds, spirulina powder.

 

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