Holy Shiitake! Quick Soup Recipe

March 5, 2012



One of our go-to dinner recipes—a staple in our regular repertoire because the bouillon cubes make it fast (and because mushrooms do a body good).

All the ingredients are coarsely chopped and cooked through and flavored in the sautéeing stage. Then once you add water, you only need to wait to bring the soup to a boil for a few more minutes, top each bowl with a little garnish, and voila, family dinner. Even better the next day after the flavors have really melded.

Into a small amount of boiling water (about 1/4" in a large soup pot), I throw the following:

•1 yellow or white onion chopped in long, lazy slices.
•2 vegan bouillon cubes (we like Rapunzel brand "with sea salt and herbs").

Sautée for a couple minutes then add:
•10-15 chopped Shiitake mushrooms (stems and all, briskly rinsed in water) and any other optional ingredients (broccoli, ginger, garlic, sliced carrots, etc.).

Stir for another couple minutes until mushrooms are cooked through.
•Add at least a pitcher full of water (enough to make your soup a soup).
•Bring to a boil, then turn down heat and simmer for another 5-10 minutes to let the flavors meld (and any optional veggies soften).
•After the heat is off, top with chopped green onions, bok choy, scallions, or chives.
•Each bowl receives a dollop of olive oil, a dash of shoyu or Braggs, and a sprinkle of black sesame seeds before the soup is ladled in.

"Milky" Lavender Tea

February 15, 2012

 

Fresh lavender buds plucked from our front yard and steeped in boiling water and Rice Dream rice milk, sweetened with agave...a seriously aromatic and dreamy to start your morning.

Score! Wild Mustard Greens in the 'Hood

February 14, 2012



We were on a walk in the hills of our Los Angeles neighborhood and spotted a patch of wild mustard greens...score. When they really go off we often see groups of elderly Seventh Day Adventist (vegan) Korean women gathering bagfuls. Our little one couldn't help but taste them despite the spice...the thrill of eating velvety yellow flowers right off the earth in an unexpected situation was too much to resist. We brought home a handful of these mustardy little buds to sprinkle on our kale salad, along with some hemp seeds. I bet you, too, have more edible fruit trees and plants in your hood than you think.

 

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